An evening in a Paris style cabaret


Paris is one of the cities where whenever you come in winter or in summer you have much to do. Much sightseeing indoors and outdoors at light-time. Partying at night-time. Belowe, some scenes seen on an evening in Lido, one of the Paris cabarets.

During our last stay there we saw two shows, one in Moulin Rouge and the other one in Lido. In Moulin Rouge there is a strict ban on making shots. Lido also prohibits photographing, but the rules are not as strict as in Moulin Rouge. I asked for a permission to make shots. So here it is, an evening show in a Paris cabaret in a small gallery of pictures.


jma_lido_12

jma_lido_first

jma_lido_08

jma_lido_09

jma_lido_10

jma_lido_second

jma_lido_04

jma_lido_05

jma_lido_07

jma_lido_14

JMA_Lido_PS_02

JMA_Lido_PS_01

jma_lido_06

jma_lido_03

jma_lido_13


Lido delivers a great show, but it a bit lighter than that of Moulin Rouge, where besides great bodies and great costumes the show delivers two quite dangerous stunts and more acrobatics. In both cabarets the quests are served champagne (included in the ticket price). Although much nudity is shown, the shows are not too tough for teenagers.


Index of posts on France >>>

Le Roi Soleil


Luis XIV the King of France (1638-1715) is one of the most prominent monarchs in the European history. As his reign lasted for over 70 years (technically it was around 60 years as he inherited the throne at the age of 6), he was able to influence the French policies and social life for many centuries ahead. He was known for running wars with basically all neighbours, using his family ties to actively run the foreign policy, reforming taxation and the state finances, sponsoring medical treatment and social work as well as promoting the art. Having moved from Louvre to Versailles he arranged for Louvre to be the art museum. I am sure historians would point out many other policy moves that changed the country for good or for bad. We should not forget however that only seventy years after the king’s dead the French revolution began overthrowing the monarchy and establishing the Republic.


jma_roi_soleil

Luis XIV, statue by Gian Lorenzo Bernini, standing in front of the Louvre


For years writers and film makers have been fascinated by intrigues and plots of the French royal court initially in Louvre and later in Versailles. Very few realise however that the fact that Luis XIV established the French court as we know it was in itself a handy political move. In past times noble families from all over Europe, basically no matter the country fought for influence making wars with each other. They often plotted against own kings. The move by Luis XIV was simple. He invited the noble or aristocratic families under his reign to practically live at or in the neighbourhood of the royal premises. Having them instantly around he controlled the plots and intrigues. Many years ago a friend of mine, who have lived in the Paris fashion world for sometime explained to me that Luis XIV is told to be the inventor of the fashion seasons. He encouraged the courtsmen to change the garment according to newest fashion trends. Besides the whole fun around the trends in fashion, this requirement was quite a political one. Instead of spending money on plots, the whole court had to constantly spend it on expensive clothing. The king controlled purses of those, who lived at the court but also filled in their itineraries. Another important side effect was boosting the fashion manufacturer’s business (clothing, shoes, various appliances and perfume) in France and abroad. The fashion industry is now a global business, but still the fashion week in Paris is the major fashion event in the world and Paris is the capital of fashion as it used to be in times of the Roi Soleil.


Index of posts on France >>>

The Panthéon


The Panthéon in Paris (not to be confused with the Pantheon in Rome) is one of the places on a must-see list in Paris. The building is relatively new, as it was built in the late XVIII century.

Originally it was thought to be a church devoted to St. Genevieve, commissioned by Louis XV (the great grand son of Luis XIV) as a votive offering for saving him from illness. It replaced the old church of St. Genevieve. The construction works lasted from 1764 to 1789 and ended just at the outburst of the French Revolution (to be exact, its first wave marked by the demolition of the Bastille). As commonly known, the French Revolution promoted civil and secular society. Thus, in 1791, the National Constituent Assembly (at this time a sort of revolutionary government in France) decided to convert the newly constructed church into a burial site, a kind of civil temple (a pantheon), for the ‘the great men of the epoch of French liberty’.

Although from this time on, the building was indeed serving as the Panthéon, its secular status was not preserved for long. Till 1885, alongside with political changes in the revolutionary France (Republic vs. Empire >>>) it regained twice its sacred status.

Although in its construction structure the building resembles a church (it has a cross pattern), and the very impressive frescoes depicting scenes of St. Genevieve life are still well-preserved, the Panthéon is a fully secular building now. As you enter and look straight at the spot where in a church you would find an altar you will see a monument devoted to the National Convention (the first French assembly elected in 1792 by a suffrage without distinctions of class) and behind it a fresco called Towards Glory depicting the Napoleonic wars >>> (that followed after the First French Republic was converted into the French Empire by Napoleon Bonaparte). In the interiors you will find some other sculptures depicting scenes of the revolutionary France. The actual pantheon, the burial site of famous French, is located below the building in the crypt. The crypt is kept very simple. Most of burial sites are located in small cells with up to five tombs. Only selected ones are additionally decorated.


Below some photo impression of this impressive building and its interiors.

The exterior, with the impressive Corinthian columns

The Pantheon, Paris, France.

The Pantheon, Paris, France.

The Pantheon, Paris, France.

Traveling France. The Pantheon, Paris, France.

Traveling France. The Pantheon, Paris, France.

Traveling France. The Pantheon, Paris, France.

Traveling France. The Pantheon, Paris, France.


The interior of the temple at the ground level

The Pantheon, Paris, France.

The Pantheon, Paris, France.

Traveling France. The Pantheon, Paris, France.

The Pantheon, Paris, France.


The National Convention statue and the Towards Glory fresco triptique at the back wall

JMA_Pantheon_Paris_07

The Pantheon, Paris, France.

The Pantheon, Paris, France.


Inside the crypt

The Pantheon, Paris, France.

The Pantheon, Paris, France.

The Pantheon, Paris, France.

The Pantheon, Paris, France.


Index of posts on France >>>